Tag Archives: Demantoid garnet

Heralds of spring – greenery

Whilst Mother Nature keeps us waiting, the world of fashion has long chosen its favourite green of the 2017 season: Greenery from the House of Pantone.

I had a chat with Jewellery News Asia (JNA) on the subject of green gemstones.

Jewellery News Asia: What are some of your fine green gemstones that you’ll be showcasing this year?

Constantin Wild: This year I have chosen four stones: first, the green demantoid from Russia, which is globally unique thanks to its needle-shaped, so-called ‘horsetail’ inclusions. Second, the chrome tourmaline from Africa, a rare variety of green tourmaline with a captivatingly intense green colour. Third, the tsavorite garnet with its manifold shades of green. And last but not least the peridot from Pakistan with its convincing size and its colour, which matches the Pantone shade ‘Greenery’. According to Pantone’s Fashion Color Report Spring 2017, ‘Greenery’ is one of this season’s on-trend colours.

JNA: What is it about green gemstones that appeal to people?

CW: We connect the colour green with nature, life and growth so green stones remind us of our desire for vitality and hope. They are a perfect match for the springtime, a time of transformation and new beginnings. And when we gaze longer at them we perceive something magical in green stones.

I personally connect ‘green’ stones, independently of their colour, with the aspiration for sustainable production. Ultimately I would like beautiful women to be able to wear our gemstones with a clear conscience. To this end I know the history of each stone and we rely consistently on hydropower for grinding our gemstones in Idar-Oberstein. 

 

Constantin Wild: Heralds of spring - Whilst Mother Nature keeps us waiting, the world of fashion has long chosen its favourite green of the 2017 season: Greenery from the House of Pantone. left round: chrome demantoid front large cushion: Pakistan peridot back cushion: tsavorite back oval: chrome tourmaline right front round: chrome demantoid
left round: chrome demantoid front large cushion: Pakistan peridot back cushion: tsavorite back oval: chrome tourmaline right front round: chrome demantoid

JNA: What are your favourite green gemstones and why?

CW: I love many stones but the diamond-like green demantoid occupies a special place in my affections. Its distinctive dispersion is fascinating because it makes the stone sparkle in all the colours of the spectrum. No other stone can compare. Green demantoids from Siberia are unique; they are the only stones in the world that gain value through their needle-shaped inclusions.

I also have a very personal connection to the green demantoid: I was one of the first to bring this stone back to the attention of the gemstone business. Carl Fabergé already knew that the ‘stone of the tsars’ was worthy of appreciation: sparkling green, full of secrets and hard to come by. Following the Russian revolution the green demantoid fell into oblivion. When it found its way to the West at the end of the 1980s it was known only to a handful of specialists, but this stone truly deserved a comeback.

 

More than just rare. More than the Big Four.

Diamond, emerald, ruby and sapphire. In the world of gemstones, the famous Big Four tend to be regarded as the measure of all things. So the prices at which they change hands on the market today are correspondingly high. But investors should be prepared to look a little further: for the fact is that Mother Nature has a lot more to offer. These four treasures, for example …

Neon-blue power: Paraiba tourmaline

An unbelievable number of facets. Radiant blue-green. The Paraiba tourmaline looks as if it is moving, as if it has come alive. And that is why it is among the world’s most valuable gemstones. The stone has the element copper to thank for its incomparable luminosity. It was not until 1987 that it appeared: first in Brazil, then later in Nigeria and Mozambique. Exactly the same kind of stone on two different continents? Millions of years ago, they were still one: the super-continent of Gondwana. In the mean time, these neon-coloured tourmalines are fetching absolutely top prices.

Paraiba tourmaline, oval, Africa
Paraiba tourmaline, oval, Africa

Highlight in orange: mandarin garnet

The mandarin garnet has only been known in the gemstone trade for 20 years, yet it is already a much celebrated star today. Its name speaks volumes. Gemstone lovers can draw attention to themselves with this fruity-coloured stone. Having said that, high-quality top-class stones of more than three carats are extremely rare. Both the demand and the price have increased markedly in recent years. That is why the mandarin garnet too is predestined for sparkling investments.

mandarin garnet, cushion
mandarin garnet, cushion

Yellow-green rarity: canary tourmaline

Back in ancient China, yellow was regarded as the colour of the emperor, as a symbol of kudos and progress. But one kind of yellow is not necessarily the same as another. A high manganese content gives the canary tourmaline – unlike other yellow tourmalines – its lemon-yellow hue and vivacious lustre. It was not until about 15 years ago that this wonderful stone was discovered in the East African country of Zambia. However, that spectacular find only produced a very limited number of stones. The canary tourmaline is a top-class stone. Specimens of more than one carat are extremely hard to find.

Canary tourmaline, oval
Canary tourmaline, oval

The green tsar: demantoid

In translation, demantoid means ‘diamond-like’. No wonder, for this rare gemstone has a refraction and dispersion that are similar to those of “a girl’s best friend”. Around 1900, the famous Peter Carl Fabergé created magnificent items of jewellery with this sparkling green treasure, which had been discovered in his Russian homeland. True connoisseurs also hold the famous ‘horsetails’ in high esteem; inclusions which are only found in Russian specimens and thus contribute to their being regarded as particularly valuable on the market.

Demantoid garnet, round, with horsetails, russia
Demantoid garnet, round, with horsetails, russia